“Chronos Cosmos: Deep Time, Open Space” @ Socrates Sculpture Park.

“Chronos Cosmos: Deep Time, Open Space” @ Socrates Sculpture Park.

Socrates has one of the best curatorial teams, hands down. Each season, and even every exhibit, showcases these magnificent variations of art and sculpture that I’ve rarely been able to experience on such a large scale. The sheer size of each exhibition, the coordinating themes, the interactivity of each piece and the environment. These are just some of the reasons I keep coming back. Each visit allows me to form a new sense of understanding with each individual piece that is on view.

Their latest exhibit, Chronos Cosmos: Deep Time, Open Space, is no different. It felt like I waited a lifetime to see this up close and personal. I’m not the most patient person, so I did visit the park during the construction of Chronos Cosmos, but nothing compares to seeing the finished product. I want to start off with Miya Ando’s piece, 銀河 Ginga (Silver River). It was like walking under an unobstructed starry nights sky. I walked the entire distance, following the bright stars printed on the navy fabric, as if looking at a clear nights sky on the outskirts of the city. It felt peaceful, and transported me somewhere far, away from the city’s commotion.

Vessel III, by Radcliffe Bailey also transports you beyond the bunker-like sculpture he created. As soon as you enter this steel structure, your attention is automatically drawn upward due to sounds being emitted from a hanging conch shell. You then realize there is a large opening at the top of the structure, allowing you to look straight out at the blue skies. The conch, along with the cylinder shape the steel frame forms, both heighten the sounds coming from the speakers placed within the conch shell by Bailey. Bailey’s Vessel III is definitely a great place to stand still and take in the elements of sound and nature.

I was genuinely taken aback by Heidi Neilson’s Moon Arrow. Neilson’s piece has a mechanism that allows it to move with and point at the moon. It also uses the movement of the moon to mark time. This occurs whether the moon is visible or not. A time lapse of the project is also available if you Click Here. If you stand very still and focus your eyes, you can literally see the arrow moving with the moon. These are very small movements, so focus is definitely necessary, but it puts so much into perspective. I think we all forget that Earth is constantly rotating. Neilson’s Moon Arrow reminded me just how perfect our planet and its functions can be.

I truly recommend everyone pay a visit to Socrates Sculpture Park. Also, keep an eye out for their Roots Saturday’s and Yoga/Tai Chi in the Park this upcoming weekend. Admission to the park, as well as all of their events, are free of charge. For more information Click Here.